Alfred Stevens – Gallery


Alfred Stevens

 

(1823 – 1906)




 

Alfred Émile Léopold Stevens was a Belgian painter.

Alfred Stevens was born in Brussels. He came from a family involved with the visual arts: his older brother and his son Léopoldwere painters, while another brother – Arthur, was an art dealer and critic.His father was an art collector who owned several watercolors by Eugène Delacroix, among other artists. His mother’s parents ran Café de l’Amitié in Brussels, a meeting place for politicians, writers, and artists.

He studied at the Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts in Brussels, where he knew François Navez, the Neo-Classical painter and former student of Jacques-Louis David. There, he drew from casts of classical sculpture for the first two years, and then drew from live models. Later he was admitted to the École des Beaux-Arts, the most important art school in Paris.

Stevens’s work was shown publicly for the first time in 1851, when three of his paintings were admitted to the Brussels Salon. He was awarded a third-class medal at the Paris Salon in 1853, and a second-class medal at the Universal Exposition in Paris in 1855.

During the 1860s, Stevens became an immensely successful painter, known for his paintings of elegant modern women. His exhibits at the Salons in Paris and Brussels attracted favorable critical attention and buyers. An excellent example of his work during this time is La Dame en Rose or Woman in Pink (Musées royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels), painted in 1866, which combines a view of a fashionably dressed woman in an interior with a detailed examination of Japanese objects, a fashionable taste called japonisme of which Stevens was an early enthusiast.

The single most important work from the second half of Stevens’s career is the monumental Panorama du Siècle, 1789–1889, which he painted with Henri Gervex. Stevens painted the women and details and Gervex the men, with the help of fifteen assistants.

In 1900, Stevens was honored by the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris with the first retrospective exhibition ever given to a living artist.

Alfred Stevens – Gallery I

 

*** The Universe Of Art TEAM ***

 

http://www.universulartei.com

Official Website The Universe Of Art

Pagina Oficială – Universul Artei

Alexander Brulloff – Gallery


Alexander Pavlovich Brullov

(Brulloff)

(1798 – 1877)


 

Alexander Pavlovich Brullov was a Russian artist; it was associated with the latest phase of the Russian Neoclassicism.

His name was spelled Brulleau until 1822, when the family name was changed according to Russian pronunciation, sometimes also spelled Brulloff.

Alexander Brullov was born in Saint Petersburg into a family of French artists: his great grandfather, his grandfather, his father and his brothers (including Karl Brullov) were artists. His first teacher was his father Paul Brulloff.

After he attended the Imperial Academy of Arts’ architect class from 1810 to 1820, and graduated with honors, was sent to Europe to study art and architecture as a pensioner of the Society for the Promotion of Artists. He spent eight years abroad from 1822 to 1830, in Italy, Germany and France, studying architecture and art. He painted a lot of watercolor portraits at that time.

In 1831, after his return to Russia, he was appointed professor of the Imperial Academy of Arts and these were the years when he created his best architectural projects. Among others, he designed and built the following buildings in St. Petersburg: Mikhailovsky Theatre (now Maliy Theater, 1831–1833), Lutheran Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul on Nevsky Prospekt (1833–1838), Pulkovo Observatory (1834–1839), the Headquarters of Guard Corps on Palace Square (1837–1843). He was one of the main architects of the reconstruction of the Winter Palace after the fire of 1837. He designed many striking interiors there including the Pompei Hall, the Malachite Room, and the White Hall.

Alexander Brullov was also talented painter. One of the best portraits created by A. Brulloff at this period was a portrait of Natalya Goncharova-Pushkina. (1831), wife of the Russian poet Alexander Pushkin. Alexander Brulloff also made illustrations for the books and magazines.

 

[The biographical information is credited to ©Wikipedia Website]

 

 

Alexander Pavlovich Brullov (Brulloff)

 – Gallery

 

*** The Universe Of Art TEAM ***

 

http://www.universulartei.com

Official Website The Universe Of Art

Pagina Oficială – Universul Artei

Alessandro Turchi – Gallery


Alessandro Turchi

 

(1578 – 1649)

 

Alessandro Turchi  was an Italian painter of the early Baroque.

He was born and active mainly in Verona, and moving late in life to Rome.

He also went by the name Alessandro Veronese or the nickname L’Orbetto.

Turchi initially trained with Felice Riccio (il Brusasorci), in Verona.

By 1603, he is already working as independent painter, and in 1606-1609, Turchi paints the organ shutters for the Filarmonica Academy of Verona.

After the death of Brusasorci, in 1605, Turchi and Pasquale Ottino complete a series of their deceased master’s canvases. In 1610, he completes an Assumption altarpiece for the church of San Luca of Verona. In 1612, the Veronese Guild of the Goldsmiths commissions from Turchi an altarpiece, today lost, of the Madonna and Saints. On leaving the school of Riccio, he went to Venice, where he worked for a time under Carlo Cagliari.

Turchi participated also in the fresco decoration (Gathering of Manna) of the Sala Reggia of the Quirinal Palace, and painted  for cardinal Scipione Borghese – a Christ, Magdalen, and Angels.

He painted also some pictures in the church of Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini.

He also painted a Flight into Egypt for the church of San Romualdo; a Holy Family for S. Lorenzo in Lucina; and a S. Carlo Borromeo in S. Salvatore in Lauro. He was much employed on cabinet pictures, representing historical subjects, which he frequently painted on black marble.

Alessandro Turchi  – Gallery

 

*** The Universe Of Art TEAM ***

http://www.universulartei.com

Official Website The Universe Of Art

Pagina Oficială – Universul Artei

Albrecht Durer – Gallery


Albrecht Dürer

(1471 – 1528)


 

Albrecht Dürer was a German painter, engraver, printmaker, mathematician, and theorist from Nuremberg.

He has been conventionally regarded as the greatest artist of the Northern Renaissance because of his high-quality woodcuts (nowadays often called Meisterstiche or “master prints”).

His vast body of work includes altarpieces, religious works, numerous portraits and self-portraits, and copper engravings.

His well-known prints include the Knight, Death, and the Devil (1513), Saint Jerome in his Study (1514) and Melencolia I (1514).

His watercolours also mark him as one of the first European landscape artists.

Between 1507 and 1511 Dürer worked on some of his most celebrated paintings: Adam and Eve (1507), The Martyrdom of the Ten Thousand (1508, for Frederick of Saxony), Virgin with the Iris (1508), the altarpiece Assumption of the Virgin (1509, for Jacob Heller of Frankfurt), and Adoration of the Trinity (1511, for Matthaeus Landauer). During this period he also completed two woodcut series, the Great Passion and the Life of the Virgin, both published in 1511 together with a second edition of the Apocalypse series.

Between 1513 and 1514 Dürer created his three most famous engravings: Knight, Death, and the Devil (1513, probably based on Erasmus’s treatise Enchiridion militis Christiani), St. Jerome in his Study, and the much-debated Melencolia I (both 1514).

Dürer’s work on human proportions is called the Four Books on Human Proportion (Vier Bücher von Menschlicher Proportion) of 1528.

[The biographical information is credited to ©Wikipedia Website]

Albrecht Dürer – Gallery

 

*** The Universe Of Art TEAM ***

http://www.universulartei.com

Official Website The Universe Of Art

Pagina Oficială – Universul Artei

Essay – The evolution of decorative art


The evolution of decorative art

ESSAY

04-Essay - The evolution of decorative art

[ Source Info:  http://archive.org/   ]

The evolution of decorative art : an essay upon its origin and development as illustrated by the art of modern races of mankind (1893)

By Balfour Henry

 

PREFACE

In presenting this short and, as I am well aware, imperfect essay to the public, I feel that it is necessary  to say a few words in justification of my action.  Although, for a proper comprehension of the growth  of Art, it is necessary that its evolution should be  studied from its very simplest beginning, this aspect  of the subject has hardly been touched upon by  writers of so-called * Histories of Art.’ In these,  frequently very excellent works, the history of art is  traced back perhaps to Assyrian and Ancient Egyptian civilisations, and a few writers dwell briefly upon the  characteristics of modern Savage Art. Few of them,  however, offer any study of the Art of the more  primitive of the living races of mankind, with a view  to explaining, by a process of reasoning from the  known to the unknown, the first efforts of Primaeval  Man to produce objects which should be pleasing to  the eye, and gratify his growing aesthetic feelings.

The Art of Design must, we know, have had a continuous history, and have grown up gradually  from simple beginnings, at first by easy stages,  involving but slight intellectual efforts, steadily  progressing until it has become an essential element  in our surroundings, absorbing a vast amount of  complex reasoning, the result of the accumulation  and combination of simple ideas, which are the outcome of experience during countless ages.

Read more from the original article here:

http://archive.org/details/evolutionofdecor00balfuoft

[for the article Full Rights Reserved ©Archive.org Website, contributors, Balfour Henry]

Exoticism in the Decorative Arts


Exoticism in the Decorative Arts

 03-Exoticism in the Decorative Arts

[ Source Info:  http://www.metmuseum.org  ]

 

 

European interest in non-Western art was first stimulated by trade with the East in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries (17.190.2045). By the nineteenth century, with the advent of the railroad and steamship, lands that were little known to Westerners became easier to access. As more Europeans traveled beyond the established routes of the Grand Tour, their experiences abroad began to influence their tastes at home. Other influences were a result of England’s massive imperial control over lands in China, India, Africa, and the Pacific. By mid-century, many non-Western forms and ornamental motifs had found their way into the vocabulary of European decorative arts.

“Like Orientalist subjects in nineteenth-century painting, exoticism in the decorative arts and interior decoration was associated with fantasies of opulence and “barbaric splendour,”

 

Read more from the original article here:

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/exot/hd_exot.htm

 

[for the article Full Rights Reserved ©The Metropolitan Museum of Art]