Essay – The evolution of decorative art


The evolution of decorative art

ESSAY

04-Essay - The evolution of decorative art

[ Source Info:  http://archive.org/   ]

The evolution of decorative art : an essay upon its origin and development as illustrated by the art of modern races of mankind (1893)

By Balfour Henry

 

PREFACE

In presenting this short and, as I am well aware, imperfect essay to the public, I feel that it is necessary  to say a few words in justification of my action.  Although, for a proper comprehension of the growth  of Art, it is necessary that its evolution should be  studied from its very simplest beginning, this aspect  of the subject has hardly been touched upon by  writers of so-called * Histories of Art.’ In these,  frequently very excellent works, the history of art is  traced back perhaps to Assyrian and Ancient Egyptian civilisations, and a few writers dwell briefly upon the  characteristics of modern Savage Art. Few of them,  however, offer any study of the Art of the more  primitive of the living races of mankind, with a view  to explaining, by a process of reasoning from the  known to the unknown, the first efforts of Primaeval  Man to produce objects which should be pleasing to  the eye, and gratify his growing aesthetic feelings.

The Art of Design must, we know, have had a continuous history, and have grown up gradually  from simple beginnings, at first by easy stages,  involving but slight intellectual efforts, steadily  progressing until it has become an essential element  in our surroundings, absorbing a vast amount of  complex reasoning, the result of the accumulation  and combination of simple ideas, which are the outcome of experience during countless ages.

Read more from the original article here:

http://archive.org/details/evolutionofdecor00balfuoft

[for the article Full Rights Reserved ©Archive.org Website, contributors, Balfour Henry]

Exoticism in the Decorative Arts


Exoticism in the Decorative Arts

 03-Exoticism in the Decorative Arts

[ Source Info:  http://www.metmuseum.org  ]

 

 

European interest in non-Western art was first stimulated by trade with the East in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries (17.190.2045). By the nineteenth century, with the advent of the railroad and steamship, lands that were little known to Westerners became easier to access. As more Europeans traveled beyond the established routes of the Grand Tour, their experiences abroad began to influence their tastes at home. Other influences were a result of England’s massive imperial control over lands in China, India, Africa, and the Pacific. By mid-century, many non-Western forms and ornamental motifs had found their way into the vocabulary of European decorative arts.

“Like Orientalist subjects in nineteenth-century painting, exoticism in the decorative arts and interior decoration was associated with fantasies of opulence and “barbaric splendour,”

 

Read more from the original article here:

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/exot/hd_exot.htm

 

[for the article Full Rights Reserved ©The Metropolitan Museum of Art]

 

Defining Decorative Arts


Defining Decorative Arts

 01-Defining Decorative Arts

[ Source Info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decorative_arts   ]

 

 

The decorative arts is traditionally a term for the design and manufacture of functional objects. It includes interior design, but not usually architecture. The decorative arts are often categorized in opposition to the “fine arts”, namely, painting, drawing, photography, and large-scale sculpture, which generally have no function other than to be seen.

The distinction between decorative and fine arts has essentially risen from the post-Renaissance art of the West, where it is for the most part meaningful. It is much less so when applied to the art of other cultures and periods, where the most highly-regarded works often include those in “decorative” media, or all works are in such media. For example, Islamic art in many periods and places consists entirely of the decorative arts, as does the art of many traditional cultures, and in Chinese art the distinction is less useful than in Europe. Even in Europe, the distinction is unhelpful for Early Medieval art, where although “fine arts” such as manuscript illumination and monumental sculpture existed, the most prestigious works, commissioned from the best artists, tended to be in goldsmith work, cast metals such as bronze or other techniques such as ivory carving. Large-scale wall-paintings were apparently much less regarded, relatively crudely executed, and rarely mentioned in contemporary sources; they were probably seen as a cheap but inferior substitute for mosaic, which in this period must be treated as a fine art, though in recent centuries contemporary production has tended to be seen as decorative. The term “ars sacra” (“sacred arts”) is sometimes used for medieval Christian art in metal, ivory, textiles and other high-value materials from this period, though this does not cover the even rarer survivals of secular works.

Modern understanding of the art of many cultures tends to be distorted by the modern privileging of fine art media over others, as well as the very different survival rates of works in different media. Works in metal, above all in precious metals, are liable to be “recycled” as soon as they fall from fashion, and were often used by owners as repositories of wealth, to be melted down when extra money was needed. Illuminated manuscripts have a much higher survival rate, especially in the hands of the church, as there was little value in the materials and they were easy to store.

The promotion of the fine arts over the decorative in European thought can largely be traced to the Renaissance, when Italian theorists such as Vasari promoted artistic values, exemplified by the artists of the High Renaissance, that placed little value on the cost of materials or the amount of skilled work required to produce a work, but instead valued artistic imagination and the individual touch of the hand of a supremely gifted master such as Michelangelo, Raphael or Leonardo da Vinci, reviving to some extent the approach of antiquity. Most European art during the Middle Ages had been produced under a very different set of values, where both expensive materials and virtuoso displays in difficult techniques had been highly valued. In China both approaches had co-existed for many centuries: ink and wash painting, mostly of landscapes, was to a large extent produced by and for the scholar-bureaucrats or “literati”, and was intended as an expression of the artist’s imagination above all, while other major fields of art, including the very important Chinese ceramics produced in effectively industrial conditions, were produced according to a completely different set of artistic values.

The lower status given to works of decorative art in contrast to fine art narrowed with the rise of the Arts and Crafts movement. This aesthetic movement of the second half of the 19th century was born in England and inspired by William Morris and John Ruskin. The movement represented the beginning of a greater appreciation of the decorative arts throughout Europe. The appeal of the Arts and Crafts Movement to a new generation led, in 1882, to the English architect and designer Arthur H. Mackmurdo organizing the Century Guild for craftsmen, which championed the idea that there was no meaningful difference between the fine and decorative arts. Many converts, both from professional artists’ ranks and from among the intellectual class as a whole, helped spread the ideas of the movement. The influence of the Arts and Crafts Moovement led to the decorative arts being given a greater appreciation and status in society and this was soon reflected by changes in the law. Until the enactment of the Copyright Act 1911 only works of fine art had been protected from unauthorised copying. The 1911 Act extended the definition of an “artistic work” to include works of “artistic craftsmanship”. For the first time works of decorative art could be classfied as works of art rather than design and benefit from the full period of copyright protection previously available only to works of fine art.

 

 

[for the article Full Rights Reserved ©Wikipedia Website]

 

How Art Can Be Good


How Art Can Be Good


10-How Art Can Be Good

 

 

I discovered an article over internet which I find it very interesting. I couldn’t find an email address to ask the permission from author, but I believe that if I quote few paragraphs and leave a link out for continuing reading the article, will be enough and honorable from me. The article is full rights reserved under the signature of ©Paul Graham

 

 

I grew up believing that taste is just a matter of personal preference. Each person has things they like, but no one’s preferences are any better than anyone else’s. There is no such thing as good taste.

 

Like a lot of things I grew up believing, this turns out to be false, and I’m going to try to explain why.

 

One problem with saying there’s no such thing as good taste is that it also means there’s no such thing as good art. If there were good art, then people who liked it would have better taste than people who didn’t. So if you discard taste, you also have to discard the idea of art being good, and artists being good at making it.

 

It was pulling on that thread that unravelled my childhood faith in relativism. When you’re trying to make things, taste becomes a practical matter. You have to decide what to do next. Would it make the painting better if I changed that part? If there’s no such thing as better, it doesn’t matter what you do. In fact, it doesn’t matter if you paint at all. You could just go out and buy a ready-made blank canvas. If there’s no such thing as good, that would be just as great an achievement as the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Less laborious, certainly, but if you can achieve the same level of performance with less effort, surely that’s more impressive, not less.”

 

“Humans have a lot more in common than this, of course. My goal is not to compile a complete list, just to show that there’s some solid ground here. People’s preferences aren’t random. So an artist working on a painting and trying to decide whether to change some part of it doesn’t have to think “Why bother? I might as well flip a coin.” Instead he can ask “What would make the painting more interesting to people?” And the reason you can’t equal Michelangelo by going out and buying a blank canvas is that the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel is more interesting to people.

 

A lot of philosophers have had a hard time believing it was possible for there to be objective standards for art. It seemed obvious that beauty, for example, was something that happened in the head of the observer, not something that was a property of objects. It was thus “subjective” rather than “objective.” But in fact if you narrow the definition of beauty to something that works a certain way on humans, and you observe how much humans have in common, it turns out to be a property of objects after all. You don’t have to choose between something being a property of the subject or the object if subjects all react similarly. Being good art is thus a property of objects as much as, say, being toxic to humans is: it’s good art if it consistently affects humans in a certain way.”

 

Those above were quoted from the original article. Please continue reading the full article here:

 

[Source Info:

http://www.paulgraham.com/goodart.html ]

 

Genurile artelor plastice


Genurile artelor plastice

 

 09-Genurile artelor plastice

 

Ţin să mulţumesc realizatorilor unui alt site ce vizează domeniul artistic, de asemenea persoanei care se ocupă cu administrarea sa pentru acordarea permisiunii de a posta unele articole care vor contribui permanent la educarea noastră şi promovarea spiritului artistic. Invit de asemenea pe cei care vor citi acest articol spre navigarea pe site-ul http://www.moldovenii.md , deoarece vor găsi acolo o resursă bogată în privinţa domeniului nostru îndrăgit: Arta.

În continuare, redau un prim articol, cu referinţă asupra artelor plastice:

[Sursa Informativă:

http://www.moldovenii.md/section/90  ]

 

Arta plastică, următoarele genuri, cunoscute ca arte majore (pictura, sculptura, grafica) şi minore, care se asociază cu artele decorative. La rîndul lor, fiecare gen are mai multe subdiviziuni, care vizează specificul tehnicii, materialul de bază utilizat şi subiectul reprezentat.

 

Pictura, de exemplu, se realizează în encaustică, temperă, ulei, acril, pe suport de lemn, pînză sau carton, în calitate de subiecte fiind selectate cele mai diverse  teme – biblice, mitologice, istorice, cotidiene, care pot fi reprezentate ca tablou de gen, peisaj, portret, natură statică, cu sau fără prezenţă umană, redate tridimensional, creînd iluzia spaţială a imaginilor prin intermediul volumului, formei, clarobscurului, facturii, luminii şi umbrei etc.

 

Grafica, la rîndul său, apelează la motive similare, avînd  însă alte materiale, forme şi tehnici, de la care, uneori provine şi denumirea subdiviziunilor – miniatură, acuarelă, pastel, gravură (desen, laviu, xilogravură, acvaforte, mezzotinto, linogravură), spre exemplu: gravura de carte sau cea de şevalet (stampa).

 

Sculptura este genul de artă care poate fi contemplată  de jur-împrejur şi poate fi realizată prin cioplire (dăltuire) (granitul, marmura) sau turnare (bronzul,diferite aliaje metalice), constituind sculptura în rond-bosse (rotundă), relief şi altorelief, apelînd, de obicei, la un limbaj plastic specific – alegoric, simbolic sau comemorativ.

 

Artele decorative (ceramica, giuvaergeria, sticla artistică, tapiseria, batic-ul) au avut la începuturi doar funcţii utilitare (pentru păstrarea, transportarea şi utilizarea alimentelor, pentru protecţie) fiind decorate cu imagini sau ornamente decorative, devenind, cu timpul, obiecte estetice de lux, care înfrumuseţează ambianţa locuinţelor. Sunt cunoscute renumitele vase de ceramică greacă pictate cu figuri roşii şi negre, porţelanul şi batic-ul chinez, majolica italiană, tapiseria franceză şi cea germană.

 

Pictura şi sculptura mai au şi o altă formă de artă – arta monumentală, care este o simbioză a supradimensionării formei şi volumelor. Din această categorie face parte sculptura (statuile, statuile ecvestre, monumentele comemorative) şi pictura cu diverse tehnici în frescă, pictură murală, mozaic, vitraliu), realizate în proporţii şi forme considerabile.

 

În diverse perioade ale existenţei artelor plastice, operele, sunt atribuite, convenţional, unor stiluri şi tendinţe diverse, delimitate pe anumite intervale de timp şi regiuni (manierism, baroc, clasicism, academism, realism, romantism, impresionism, postimpresionism, abstracţionism, etc.), manifestîndu-se în cadrul tuturor genurilor de artă.

 

Operele de artă plastică sunt principalele obiective ale muzeelor şi colecţiilor de artă din toată lumea.  “

 

[pentru articol, Drepturi Depline Rezervate © Moldovenii.md ]

 

 

Common Misconceptions Artists Have About Galleries


Common Misconceptions Artists Have About Galleries

 08-Common Misconceptions Artists Have About Galleries

 

I recently discovered a great article in which are explained some aspects of our beloved domain, ART. For the article, full rights reserved to ©Alan Bamberger .

In few lines, according with the permission to post a fragment from the article, I  quote:

 

In an ongoing effort to separate art world facts from fantasy, I contacted a number of gallery owners and asked whether they could relate some beliefs artists have about galleries and gallery owners that simply aren’t true. Successful artist/gallery relationships are built on trust, knowledge, cooperation and understanding, and the better and more informed artists are about how art galleries really work, the greater the chances that their gallery relationships will succeed and prosper. So are you ready to exorcise those erroneous notions?”

Please continue reading the article, discovering the common misconceptions and reality, here:

 

[Source Info:

http://www.artbusiness.com/misconceptions-artists-have-about-galleries.html  ]