How Art Can Be Good


How Art Can Be Good


10-How Art Can Be Good

 

 

I discovered an article over internet which I find it very interesting. I couldn’t find an email address to ask the permission from author, but I believe that if I quote few paragraphs and leave a link out for continuing reading the article, will be enough and honorable from me. The article is full rights reserved under the signature of ©Paul Graham

 

 

I grew up believing that taste is just a matter of personal preference. Each person has things they like, but no one’s preferences are any better than anyone else’s. There is no such thing as good taste.

 

Like a lot of things I grew up believing, this turns out to be false, and I’m going to try to explain why.

 

One problem with saying there’s no such thing as good taste is that it also means there’s no such thing as good art. If there were good art, then people who liked it would have better taste than people who didn’t. So if you discard taste, you also have to discard the idea of art being good, and artists being good at making it.

 

It was pulling on that thread that unravelled my childhood faith in relativism. When you’re trying to make things, taste becomes a practical matter. You have to decide what to do next. Would it make the painting better if I changed that part? If there’s no such thing as better, it doesn’t matter what you do. In fact, it doesn’t matter if you paint at all. You could just go out and buy a ready-made blank canvas. If there’s no such thing as good, that would be just as great an achievement as the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Less laborious, certainly, but if you can achieve the same level of performance with less effort, surely that’s more impressive, not less.”

 

“Humans have a lot more in common than this, of course. My goal is not to compile a complete list, just to show that there’s some solid ground here. People’s preferences aren’t random. So an artist working on a painting and trying to decide whether to change some part of it doesn’t have to think “Why bother? I might as well flip a coin.” Instead he can ask “What would make the painting more interesting to people?” And the reason you can’t equal Michelangelo by going out and buying a blank canvas is that the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel is more interesting to people.

 

A lot of philosophers have had a hard time believing it was possible for there to be objective standards for art. It seemed obvious that beauty, for example, was something that happened in the head of the observer, not something that was a property of objects. It was thus “subjective” rather than “objective.” But in fact if you narrow the definition of beauty to something that works a certain way on humans, and you observe how much humans have in common, it turns out to be a property of objects after all. You don’t have to choose between something being a property of the subject or the object if subjects all react similarly. Being good art is thus a property of objects as much as, say, being toxic to humans is: it’s good art if it consistently affects humans in a certain way.”

 

Those above were quoted from the original article. Please continue reading the full article here:

 

[Source Info:

http://www.paulgraham.com/goodart.html ]

 

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Common Misconceptions Artists Have About Galleries


Common Misconceptions Artists Have About Galleries

 08-Common Misconceptions Artists Have About Galleries

 

I recently discovered a great article in which are explained some aspects of our beloved domain, ART. For the article, full rights reserved to ©Alan Bamberger .

In few lines, according with the permission to post a fragment from the article, I  quote:

 

In an ongoing effort to separate art world facts from fantasy, I contacted a number of gallery owners and asked whether they could relate some beliefs artists have about galleries and gallery owners that simply aren’t true. Successful artist/gallery relationships are built on trust, knowledge, cooperation and understanding, and the better and more informed artists are about how art galleries really work, the greater the chances that their gallery relationships will succeed and prosper. So are you ready to exorcise those erroneous notions?”

Please continue reading the article, discovering the common misconceptions and reality, here:

 

[Source Info:

http://www.artbusiness.com/misconceptions-artists-have-about-galleries.html  ]

 

What Does the Bible Say About Art? – III


What Does the Bible Say About Art?

[III]

 

04-What Does the Bible Say About Art III

 

[Source Info: http://www.openbible.info/topics/art  ]

 

 

Jeremiah 18:3

 

So I went down to the potter’s house, and there he was working at his wheel.

 

Proverbs 31:13

 

She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands.

 

Psalm 51:9-10

 

Hide your face from my sins, and blot out all my iniquities. Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me.

 

Genesis 1:1-2

 

In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters.

 

Proverbs 31:24

 

She makes linen garments and sells them; she delivers sashes to the merchant.

 

Proverbs 31:19

 

She puts her hands to the distaff, and her hands hold the spindle.

 

1 Chronicles 22:15

 

You have an abundance of workmen: stonecutters, masons, carpenters, and all kinds of craftsmen without number, skilled in working

 

2 Samuel 5:11

 

And Hiram king of Tyre sent messengers to David, and cedar trees, also carpenters and masons who built David a house.

 

1 Samuel 8:13

 

He will take your daughters to be perfumers and cooks and bakers.

 

Exodus 30:25

 

And you shall make of these a sacred anointing oil blended as by the perfumer; it shall be a holy anointing oil.

 

Genesis 4:21

 

His brother’s name was Jubal; he was the father of all those who play the lyre and pipe.

 

 

Revelation 21:2

 

And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.

 

[for the article Full Rights Reserved ©Crossway Bibles]

 

A Guide to Writing about Art


A Guide to Writing about Art

 14-A Guide to Writing about Art

This is an article concerning our beloved domain – ART! I wish to express my greetings to a website which allowed me the right of sharing this article: Thank You! Also, you are invited to visit the website as you will find more interesting things; a website which contributes to development of art:

 The University of Iowa

 

[Source Info:

http://www.uiowa.edu/~writingc/writers/handouts/WritingAboutArt.shtml  ]

 

A Guide to Writing about Art

 

 

“When you analyze, you are seeking to account for your experience of the work.”

“An unanswered question is an essay topic in disguise.”

We write about art to clarify and to account for our responses to works that interest, excite, or frustrate us.  When writing a paper we not only look at what is in front of us, but what is within.  Here is a basic checklist to keep in mind when drafting a paper:

  1. Interesting title.
  2. Intro includes essential info.
  3. There is a point (thesis).
  4. The point is well supported with persuasive details.
  5. The needs of the audience have been addressed.
  6. The paper is well organized.
  7. Personal views are included.
  8. It satisfies the assignment.

How to begin:

There are three main considerations when writing about art:

  • subject matter
  • form
  • socio-historical context

Each of these affect the meaning or content you take away from a piece. In your analysis you might choose a single design element of the piece that illuminates your experience of it (i.e.: the scale of the piece, effect of gaze of the artist or viewer, the brushstrokes). When analyzing art, consider the following questions. After you answer each one remember to further ask yourself:

  1. Why the artist might have made that choice, and
  2. How does it affect the viewer’s reaction to, or relationship with, the piece?

General Questions:

  • What is the title?
  • Why was it made? What is its purpose?
  • If it’s a portrait – does it portray an individual or a social type? What aspect of the sitter’s personality is expressed?
  • If there is a figure, what is its gaze as it relates to the gaze of the artist or viewer?
  • What is the relationship between the parts?
  • What is the medium, color, scale?
  • What techniques did the artist use?
  • Where is it located?
  • Are there any connections with earlier art history – or history in general?
  •  Is there any symbolism?
  • What is the artist’s philosophy?
  • Does the piece appear as it was originally constructed?
  •  What is the size?
  • Where is the main subject in relation to the foreground, background and middle ground?

Drawing and Painting:

  • If it is a still life, what does the artist focus on, technique, composition?
  • In a landscape, is there any human interaction with the land? Whose view of the natural world might the artist have represented?

Sculpture:

  • Is there a pose? What does the pose suggest?
  • What does the clothing suggest? Is it heavy or light?
  • Is the piece geometric? Irregular? In silhouette?
  • If you are looking at a bust, note the truncation?
  • Why would the sculptor chose to stop there? Is there a base?
  • Is the sculpture carved or molded? What is its texture? Does it reflect the medium or the facture (the process of working on the medium)?

Photography:

  • Who was the photographer, an individual or a firm?
  • What is the overall focus?
  • What type of development process was used; what kind of paper?
  • On what material is the photograph printed?
  • Has it been tinted, retouched or cropped?
  • Was natural or artificial light used?
  • What is the range of light and dark?
  • What did the photographer chose for exposure time? Are there blurs or motions which indicate the passage of time?

Video Art:

  • What is the visual impact? (Consider the work as you would a sculpture.)
  • Is there sound?
  • What is the context? (Of the video, of the piece as a whole.)
  • Are there any political implications?

Architecture:

  • How is the structural system of a building/monument suited to its purpose?
  • What is the interior hierarchy of spaces?  Do they flow, connect well to the exterior?
  • What kind of statement does the building make about the thing it will house? (If it is a bank, what does it say about money? If it is a library, what does it say about knowledge?)
  • How do you approach the building and enter it?
  • Are there blueprints of the work? Do they change your impression of the building?

Please note: reproductions (in books or slides) offer little sense of the actual size and texture of the original. If possible, make an effort to see the work you are writing about or ask your professor to recommend a good book or website.

The information in this handout is excerpted from A Short Guide to Writing about Art (8th ed.), by Sylvan Barnet.

–The Writing Center thanks April Freely, Emma Rainey, and Emily Weirich for contributing this handout.

 

 

[for the article Full Rights Reserved ©The University of Iowa]

 

 

What Does the Bible Say About Art? – II


What Does the Bible Say About Art?

[II]

 

02-What Does the Bible Say About Art  II

 

[Source Info: http://www.openbible.info/topics/art  ]

 

 

Revelation 21:11

 

Having the glory of God, its radiance like a most rare jewel, like a jasper, clear as crystal.

 

1 Kings 7:13-51

 

And King Solomon sent and brought Hiram from Tyre. He was the son of a widow of the tribe of Naphtali, and his father was a man of Tyre, a worker in bronze. And he was full of wisdom, understanding, and skill for making any work in bronze. He came to King Solomon and did all his work. He cast two pillars of bronze. Eighteen cubits was the height of one pillar, and a line of twelve cubits measured its circumference. It was hollow, and its thickness was four fingers. The second pillar was the same. He also made two capitals of cast bronze to set on the tops of the pillars. The height of the one capital was five cubits, and the height of the other capital was five cubits. There were lattices of checker work with wreaths of chain work for the capitals on the tops of the pillars, a lattice for the one capital and a lattice for the other capital. …

 

1 Samuel 18:6

 

As they were coming home, when David returned from striking down the Philistine, the women came out of all the cities of Israel, singing and dancing, to meet King Saul, with tambourines, with songs of joy, and with musical instruments.

 

Exodus 31:2-9

 

“See, I have called by name Bezalel the son of Uri, son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah, and I have filled him with the Spirit of God, with ability and intelligence, with knowledge and all craftsmanship, to devise artistic designs, to work in gold, silver, and bronze, in cutting stones for setting, and in carving wood, to work in every craft. And behold, I have appointed with him Oholiab, the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan. And I have given to all able men ability, that they may make all that I have commanded you: …

 

2 Timothy 1:6

 

For this reason I remind you to fan into flame the gift of God, which is in you through the laying on of my hands,

 

Proverbs 31:21-22

 

She is not afraid of snow for her household, for all her household are clothed in scarlet. She makes bed coverings for herself; her clothing is fine linen and purple.

 

2 Chronicles 24:12

 

And the king and Jehoiada gave it to those who had charge of the work of the house of the Lord, and they hired masons and carpenters to restore the house of the Lord, and also workers in iron and bronze to repair the house of the Lord.

 

2 Timothy 2:20-21

 

Now in a great house there are not only vessels of gold and silver but also of wood and clay, some for honorable use, some for dishonorable. Therefore, if anyone cleanses himself from what is dishonorable, he will be a vessel for honorable use, set apart as holy, useful to the master of the house, ready for every good work.

 

[for the article Full Rights Reserved ©Crossway Bibles]

 

What Does the Bible Say About Art? – I


What Does the Bible Say About Art?

 [I]

 

01-What Does the Bible Say About Art  I

 

[Source Info: http://www.openbible.info/topics/art  ]

 

 

Isaiah 64:8

 

But now, O Lord, you are our Father; we are the clay, and you are our potter; we are all the work of your hand.

 

Exodus 35:35

 

He has filled them with skill to do every sort of work done by an engraver or by a designer or by an embroiderer in blue and purple and scarlet yarns and fine twined linen, or by a weaver—by any sort of workman or skilled designer.

 

Exodus 35:30-35

 

Then Moses said to the people of Israel, “See, the Lord has called by name Bezalel the son of Uri, son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah; and he has filled him with the Spirit of God, with skill, with intelligence, with knowledge, and with all craftsmanship, to devise artistic designs, to work in gold and silver and bronze, in cutting stones for setting, and in carving wood, for work in every skilled craft. And he has inspired him to teach, both him and Oholiab the son of Ahisamach of the tribe of Dan. …

 

 

2 Chronicles 2:14

 

The son of a woman of the daughters of Dan, and his father was a man of Tyre. He is trained to work in gold, silver, bronze, iron, stone, and wood, and in purple, blue, and crimson fabrics and fine linen, and to do all sorts of engraving and execute any design that may be assigned him, with your craftsmen, the craftsmen of my lord, David your father.

 

1 Chronicles 15:16

 

David also commanded the chiefs of the Levites to appoint their brothers as the singers who should play loudly on musical instruments, on harps and lyres and cymbals, to raise sounds of joy.

 

Exodus 28:3

 

You shall speak to all the skillful, whom I have filled with a spirit of skill, that they make Aaron’s garments to consecrate him for my priesthood.

 

Exodus 35:25

 

And every skillful woman spun with her hands, and they all brought what they had spun in blue and purple and scarlet yarns and fine twined linen.

 

Exodus 31:2-14

 

“See, I have called by name Bezalel the son of Uri, son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah, and I have filled him with the Spirit of God, with ability and intelligence, with knowledge and all craftsmanship, to devise artistic designs, to work in gold, silver, and bronze, in cutting stones for setting, and in carving wood, to work in every craft. And behold, I have appointed with him Oholiab, the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan. And I have given to all able men ability, that they may make all that I have commanded you: …

 

[for the article Full Rights Reserved ©Crossway Bibles]